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Ninety Percent Reduction in Cancer Mortality after Chelation Therapy With EDTA

chelation cancer age

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#1 Logic

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 02:10 PM


Ninety Percent Reduction in Cancer Mortality after Chelation Therapy With EDTA
http://gordonresearc...ton_blumer.html

Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications
http://diabetes.diab...t/61/3/549.long

In light of the above; Chelation is worthy of more attention and research IMHO.
I am now looking into areliable practitioner locally as well as compiling a list of minerals that need to be replaced after therapy. (best forms and suppliers etc.)

After this a regmn to prevent further buildup of heavy metals and AGEs is reqd:

Fighting Methylglyoxal with alagebrium.
http://www.longecity...ith-alagebrium/

Fo-Ti fights AGEs
http://www.longecity...ti-fights-ages/

http://www.longecity...aminoguanidine/

2,3,5,4'-tetera-hydroxystilbene from Fo-Ti breaks..? pentosidine AGEs
http://www.longecity...gebriumalt-711/
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#2 Logic

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 02:19 PM

http://www.alkalizef...et/Liodine2.htm
Iodine and Chelation
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#3 Mind

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:49 PM

Thanks for starting this thread Logic. Good informtion. Hopefully our community can lend some ideas/help in the development of truly functional AGE-Breakers which unfortunately do not really exit yet. The current crop of "AGE-Breakers" seem to promote positive health outcomes due other methods of actions besides "breaking AGEs".

Despite the lack of evidence for their AGE-breaking activity, AGE breakers are potent chelators, and their hydrolysis products have even stronger chelating activity than the intact compounds (23) (Table 1). In addition, all of the activities ascribed to AGE breakers in in vitro assays, including dissociation of AGE-albumin complexes and immunoglobulin adducts on red cells, and in vivo effects on collagen cross-linking have been replicated in detail with several LR compounds (17,18), which lack functional groups that could cleave dicarbonyl compounds. In summary, despite several animal model and clinical studies that convincingly demonstrate the merits of AGE breakers for treatment of cardiovascular and renal pathology in diabetes and aging (4,5,3437), the effects of these compounds are unlikely to be related to their proposed mechanism of action and may be explained largely, if not completely, by their chelating and antioxidant activities. Chelation, by inhibition of glycoxidation reactions, would limit the progression from AGE precursor to AGE cross-link, enabling the rejuvenation of the extracellular matrix by turnover of cross-linked proteins and biosynthesis of native matrix proteins.



#4 Andey

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:16 PM

I found nice summarizing article on fighiting AGEs, not shure if it was mentioned before.

http://www.antiaging...-and-inhibitors
Article author, dr Marios Kyriazis is one of the leading British gerontologist, cofounder of lifeboat foundation. He wrote a lot of interesting articles on aging.

#5 Logic

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 01:00 PM

Safe chelation of Mercury/Cadmium/Iron/Lead
http://www.longecity...admiumironlead/

#6 Logic

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 03:11 PM

Preventative Heavy Metal Detoxification
http://www.longecity...detoxification/

Ironing out memory loss
http://ouroboros.wor...ut-memory-loss/
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#7 Logic

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 03:55 PM

Mercury filling removal
http://www.longecity...illing-removal/
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#8 joelcairo

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:13 PM

I'm a little suspicious of that "90% reduction" study. Nonetheless there are a number of metals that are known to be associated with cancer (copper, cadmium, chromium, iron) or that may be associated (lead, mercury).

I've never had chelation therapy because I don't want to go through a whole detox rigamarole, but I take several supplements that are known to chelate metals from the body. Without going back to do research, I think IP6, alpha lipoic acid, garlic and quercetin have this effect.

#9 Logic

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:17 PM

Im still reading up on chelation.
These links were collected with kidney damagein mind.
http://www.townsendl...lation_jc_c.htm
http://www.stemcellm...reatments/edta/
http://www.drhoffman.com/page.cfm/90
http://emedicine.med...ent#aw2aab6b6b2
http://drcranton.com...calciumedta.htm
http://drcranton.com/shortbottle.htm
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#10 Kevnzworld

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:56 PM

Thanks Logic. I have to go through these studies when I have time. I am a believer in the efficacy and health benefits of removing heavy metals with chelation therapy.
I have never been tested, but I plan to. It's especially important for people that may have had heavy metal exposure in a work environment, or just mercury fillings.
There is a a lot of controversy currently regarding the efficacy of chelation as a treatment for atherosclorosis .

#11 Logic

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

Chelation of intracellular iron with the antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine induces cell death in leukemia and myeloma cells

http://bloodjournal....4/3064.abstract

#12 niner

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:45 PM

Logic, do you have the reference for the "Ninety Percent Reduction in Cancer Mortality" claim in the title of this thread? (The link above is broken) Is that in humans? What kinds of cancers? How long did they follow the patients or animals? I'd like to try to separate the science from the quackery here.


#13 Logic

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

Logic, do you have the reference for the "Ninety Percent Reduction in Cancer Mortality" claim in the title of this thread? (The link above is broken) Is that in humans? What kinds of cancers? How long did they follow the patients or animals? I'd like to try to separate the science from the quackery here.


New link:
http://oradix.com/ne...iss-study).html

http://www.relfe.com...osis_cancer.htm

I completly agree that the study is not of the same calibre as most here; hence the one above your post.

After much searching it seems likey that reputable institutions wont go anywhere near this for fear of losing their funding, reputation and careers.
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#14 Kevnzworld

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:52 PM

There was a large study , funded by the NIH called TACT to determine the safety and efficacy of chelation therapy (EDTA ) as a treatment for heart disease. There is a lot of controversy surrounding it, and the results have been withheld to date as it goes through the peer review process. You know that Big Pharma has the sharp knives out on this one.....
Here is a preliminary quote:
" Preliminary results, which will be released during the American Heart Association’s 2012 Scientific Sessions, found that a chelation regimen is safe in the context of a clinical trial and suggest that there may be benefits in some patients with coronary heart disease."

http://www.nhlbi.nih...gibbons-md.html

#15 niner

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:49 AM

I've seen a brief report of the preliminary TACT data. It looks like a reasonable study. There were 1708 participants, average age 65, 82% male. One third had diabetes, two thirds had hypertension. At least three quarters of them were on aspirin, statins, and/or beta blockers. The intervention was an IV infusion of Na2EDTA, with 7g ascorbic acid, 2g magnesium, and 2500 units of heparin. Half the group got placebo infusions. Patients were infused once a week for 30 weeks, followed by an additional ten doses given every 2 to 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality, MI, stroke, hospitalization for angina, and coronary revascularization. Over a 55 month followup, in the treatment group, one or more of these bad outcomes occurred 26.5% of the time, while in the placebo group, it was 30% of the time. This was statistically significant, but barely. It was said to work better in diabetics, and that most of the difference in outcomes was driven by a lower need for revascularization procedures. The trial had a withdrawal rate of 17%. Big Pharma and their lackeys will emphasize the "but barely" part. The alternative med community will presumably say "they did it wrong!" and claim that had it been done differently, it would have been ten times better, and that it was "designed to fail".
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#16 Logic

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 05:15 PM

Thx Niner and everyone for your interest and valuble input.

It's interesting that most of the difference in outcomes was driven by a lower need for revascularization procedures.
"...trial had a withdrawal rate of 17%..."
Do they by any chance state the ratio of withdrawn participants on placebo to genuine treatment..?

What are your opinions on this:

Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2438277/

#17 Logic

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 06:52 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/6441110
The improvement in renal function following EDTA chelation and multi-vitamin-trace mineral therapy: a study in creatinine clearance.

#18 niner

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:18 PM

It's interesting that most of the difference in outcomes was driven by a lower need for revascularization procedures.
"...trial had a withdrawal rate of 17%..."
Do they by any chance state the ratio of withdrawn participants on placebo to genuine treatment..?


I'm sure that the data exists somewhere, but I haven't seen it. Offhand I would expect the split to be similar, assuming there weren't bad side effects. A weekly infusion (which takes hours, and effectively blows a day) is a pretty grueling protocol. I'm surprised they didn't lose more.

What are your opinions on this:

Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2438277/


Good God, who ARE those people? What's their story? Is that a real journal? Now that the trial has shown some moderate efficacy and no one has died, I wonder what they're saying?

#19 Logic

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

What are your opinions on this:

Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2438277/


Good God, who ARE those people? What's their story? Is that a real journal? Now that the trial has shown some moderate efficacy and no one has died, I wonder what they're saying?


:laugh:
I speculate that they WERE saying exactly what they were paid to say.

#20 pleb

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:31 AM

http://www.quackwatc.../chelation.html

I found this after reading the posts, it may prove interesting, ?

#21 niner

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:28 PM

http://www.quackwatc.../chelation.html

I found this after reading the posts, it may prove interesting, ?


The guy who wrote it died in 2007, and there was no mention at all of TACT, even though the trial had been underway for a long time. This is typical of quackwatch. I don't think they are a reliable source of information.

#22 pleb

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:00 PM

Thanks niner, i had no idea of how accurate it was but figured someone on here would know,

#23 mait

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 12:59 AM

I have been using humic and fulvic acid as chelation agents in my supplement regime. A quick overview about fulvic and humic acid effects: http://www.humicheal...heavymetal.html

#24 Logic

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 09:59 AM

A very interisting find by dear mrclock here:
http://www.longecity...851#entry561851

the Novel multifunctional brain permeable iron, chelator M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargyaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline] was shown to possess neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo, against several insults applicable to various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that systemic chronic administration of M30 resulted in up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein levels in various brain regions (e.g. cortex, striatum, and hippocampus) and spinal cord of adult mice. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that M30 differentially induced HIF-1α-dependent target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), enolase-1, transferrin receptor (TfR), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and glucose transporter (GLUT)-1. In addition, mRNA expression levels of the growth factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and three antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were up-regulated by M30 treatment in a brain-region-dependent manner. Signal transduction immunoblotting studies revealed that M30 induced a differential enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK), protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Together, these results suggest that the multifunctional iron chelator M30 can up-regulate a number of neuroprotective-adaptive mechanisms and pro-survival signaling pathways in the brain that might function as important therapeutic targets for the drug in the context of neurodegenerative disease therapy.
http://www.keepthefa...jE1NzA0NTA=.htm

#25 niner

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:52 PM

Wow, M30 is a very interesting compound. the group in Haifa that developed it has had it since 2005. Eight years seems like enough time to figure out if it's toxic and get it into humans. I wonder if that's happened yet?

Here's a recent report of an animal experiment:

Mech Ageing Dev. 2012 May;133(5):267-74. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2012.03.001. Epub 2012 Mar 10.
Neuroprotection by the multitarget iron chelator M30 on age-related alterations in mice.
Kupershmidt L, Amit T, Bar-Am O, Youdim MB, Weinreb O.

Eve Topf Centers of Excellence for Neurodegenerative Diseases Research and Department of Pharmacology, Rappaport Family Research Institute Technion-Faculty of Medicine, Haifa 31096, Israel.

Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelating compound, M30, possessing the neuroprotective N-propargyl moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor, rasagiline and the antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of the iron chelator, VK28. Here, we report that a chronic systemic treatment of aged mice with M30 (1 and 5mg/kg; 4 times weekly for 6 months), had a significant positive impact on neuropsychiatry functions and cognitive age-related impairment. M30 significantly reduced cerebral iron accumulation as demonstrated by Perl's staining, accompanied by a marked decrease in cerebral β-amyloid plaques. In addition, our results demonstrate that M30 caused a significant inhibition of both MAO-A and -B activities in the cerebellum of aged mice, compared with vehicle-treated aged control mice. In summary, the present study indicates that the novel MAO inhibitor/iron chelating drug, M30, acting against multiple brain targets could reverse age-associated memory impairment and provide a potential treatment against the progression of neurodegeneration in ageing.

PMID: 22426424


The following might explain where things are going- the guys from the Haifa group have started (or hooked up with) a company in the US. I would guess they are going to try to take it far enough forward to sell it to a big pharma for very large money, or less likely, try to take it all the way to market themselves. Either way, expect it to take a hell of a long time to see the light of day. I imagine that intrepid experimenters could get a batch whipped up by a Chinese synthesis house without too much trouble.

Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30(1):1-16. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2012-120013.
From anti-Parkinson's drug rasagiline to novel multitarget iron chelators with acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase inhibitory and neuroprotective properties for Alzheimer's disease.
Zheng H, Amit T, Bar-Am O, Fridkin M, Youdim MB, Mandel SA.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Intra-Cellular Therapies Inc., New York, NY, USA.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial syndrome involving a complex array of different, while related, factors in its progression. Accordingly, novel approaches that can simultaneously modulate several disease-related targets hold great promise for the effective treatment of AD. This review describes the development of novel hybrid molecules with multimodal activity, including: i) M30, the brain permeable selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and -B inhibitor with chelating and neuroprotective activity; ii) HLA20, a brain permeable metal chelator with neuroprotective activity; iii) HLA20A, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor with site-activated chelating and neuroprotective activity; iv) M30D, an AChE and MAO-A and -B inhibitor with site-activated chelating and neuroprotective activity; and v) analogs of the neuroprotective aminoacid peptide, NAPVSIPQ. HLA20A and M30D act as pro-chelators and can be activated to liberate their respective active chelators HLA20 and M30 through pseudo inhibition of AChE. We first discuss the knowledge and structure-based strategy for the rational design of these novel compounds. Then, we review our recent studies on these drug candidates, regarding their wide range in vitro and in vivo activities, with emphasis on antioxidant-chelating potency and AchE and MAO-A and -B inhibitory activity, as well as neuroprotective/neurorescue effects. Finally, we discuss the diverse molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds with relevance to AD, including modulation of amyloid-β; and amyloid-β; protein precursor expression/processing; induction of cell cycle arrest; inhibition of neuronal death markers; and upregulation of neurotrophic factors, as well as activation of protein kinase signaling pathways.

PMID: 22387411



#26 mait

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:46 PM

What about curcumin?

From http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/16545682:

Curcumin is among the more successful chemopreventive compounds investigated in recent years, and is currently in human trials to prevent cancer. The mechanism of action of curcumin is complex and likely multifactorial. We have made the unexpected observation that curcumin strikingly modulates proteins of iron metabolism in cells and in tissues, suggesting that curcumin has properties of an iron chelator. Curcumin increased mRNA levels of ferritin and GSTalpha in cultured liver cells. Unexpectedly, however, although levels of GSTalpha protein increased in parallel with mRNA levels in response to curcumin, levels of ferritin protein declined. Since iron chelators repress ferritin translation, we considered that curcumin may act as an iron chelator. To test this hypothesis, we measured the effect of curcumin on transferrin receptor 1, a protein stabilized under conditions of iron limitation, as well as the ability of curcumin to activate iron regulatory proteins (IRPs). Both transferrin receptor 1 and activated IRP, indicators of iron depletion, increased in response to curcumin. Consistent with the hypothesis that curcumin acts as an iron chelator, mice that were fed diets supplemented with curcumin exhibited a decline in levels of ferritin protein in the liver. These results suggest that iron chelation may be an additional mode of action of curcumin.


Edited by mait, 27 January 2013 - 05:47 PM.

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#27 Logic

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:40 PM

Thx mait; interesting info.
Curcumin continues to supprise me.

#28 Logic

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:56 PM

Wow, M30 is a very interesting compound. the group in Haifa that developed it has had it since 2005. Eight years seems like enough time to figure out if it's toxic and get it into humans. I wonder if that's happened yet?

...The following might explain where things are going- the guys from the Haifa group have started (or hooked up with) a company in the US. I would guess they are going to try to take it far enough forward to sell it to a big pharma for very large money, or less likely, try to take it all the way to market themselves. Either way, expect it to take a hell of a long time to see the light of day. I imagine that intrepid experimenters could get a batch whipped up by a Chinese synthesis house without too much trouble.


Thx Niner
Lets hope that some 'intrepid experimenters' do just that! :)

#29 dear mrclock

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 05:43 AM

Wow, M30 is a very interesting compound. the group in Haifa that developed it has had it since 2005. Eight years seems like enough time to figure out if it's toxic and get it into humans. I wonder if that's happened yet?

Here's a recent report of an animal experiment:

Mech Ageing Dev. 2012 May;133(5):267-74. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2012.03.001. Epub 2012 Mar 10.
Neuroprotection by the multitarget iron chelator M30 on age-related alterations in mice.
Kupershmidt L, Amit T, Bar-Am O, Youdim MB, Weinreb O.

Eve Topf Centers of Excellence for Neurodegenerative Diseases Research and Department of Pharmacology, Rappaport Family Research Institute Technion-Faculty of Medicine, Haifa 31096, Israel.

Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelating compound, M30, possessing the neuroprotective N-propargyl moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor, rasagiline and the antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of the iron chelator, VK28. Here, we report that a chronic systemic treatment of aged mice with M30 (1 and 5mg/kg; 4 times weekly for 6 months), had a significant positive impact on neuropsychiatry functions and cognitive age-related impairment. M30 significantly reduced cerebral iron accumulation as demonstrated by Perl's staining, accompanied by a marked decrease in cerebral β-amyloid plaques. In addition, our results demonstrate that M30 caused a significant inhibition of both MAO-A and -B activities in the cerebellum of aged mice, compared with vehicle-treated aged control mice. In summary, the present study indicates that the novel MAO inhibitor/iron chelating drug, M30, acting against multiple brain targets could reverse age-associated memory impairment and provide a potential treatment against the progression of neurodegeneration in ageing.

PMID: 22426424


The following might explain where things are going- the guys from the Haifa group have started (or hooked up with) a company in the US. I would guess they are going to try to take it far enough forward to sell it to a big pharma for very large money, or less likely, try to take it all the way to market themselves. Either way, expect it to take a hell of a long time to see the light of day. I imagine that intrepid experimenters could get a batch whipped up by a Chinese synthesis house without too much trouble.

Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30(1):1-16. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2012-120013.
From anti-Parkinson's drug rasagiline to novel multitarget iron chelators with acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase inhibitory and neuroprotective properties for Alzheimer's disease.
Zheng H, Amit T, Bar-Am O, Fridkin M, Youdim MB, Mandel SA.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Intra-Cellular Therapies Inc., New York, NY, USA.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial syndrome involving a complex array of different, while related, factors in its progression. Accordingly, novel approaches that can simultaneously modulate several disease-related targets hold great promise for the effective treatment of AD. This review describes the development of novel hybrid molecules with multimodal activity, including: i) M30, the brain permeable selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and -B inhibitor with chelating and neuroprotective activity; ii) HLA20, a brain permeable metal chelator with neuroprotective activity; iii) HLA20A, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor with site-activated chelating and neuroprotective activity; iv) M30D, an AChE and MAO-A and -B inhibitor with site-activated chelating and neuroprotective activity; and v) analogs of the neuroprotective aminoacid peptide, NAPVSIPQ. HLA20A and M30D act as pro-chelators and can be activated to liberate their respective active chelators HLA20 and M30 through pseudo inhibition of AChE. We first discuss the knowledge and structure-based strategy for the rational design of these novel compounds. Then, we review our recent studies on these drug candidates, regarding their wide range in vitro and in vivo activities, with emphasis on antioxidant-chelating potency and AchE and MAO-A and -B inhibitory activity, as well as neuroprotective/neurorescue effects. Finally, we discuss the diverse molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds with relevance to AD, including modulation of amyloid-β; and amyloid-β; protein precursor expression/processing; induction of cell cycle arrest; inhibition of neuronal death markers; and upregulation of neurotrophic factors, as well as activation of protein kinase signaling pathways.

PMID: 22387411



yeah sure is, and i seem to be the discoverer of it on this forum. but you seem to give me little credit for anything i have done here so far. :(

tnx logic! for bringing its attention to the rest of the members here. im not quite popular and nobody pays me attention if you can see :(

Edited by dear mrclock, 28 January 2013 - 05:43 AM.

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#30 hav

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

Here's another paper supporting the effectiveness and safety of ETDA chelation therapy:

EDTA chelation reappraisal following new clinical trials and regular use in millions of patients: review of preliminary findings and risk/benefit assessment.

EDTA chelation therapy is regularly used in thousands of patients worldwide. An FDA approval of more than 50 years ago for heavy metal detoxification prompted many physicians to use EDTA as an alternative medicine for many categories of patients. Recently, NIH initiated the so-called Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT), which has been designed to evaluate whether EDTA and high dose oral vitamins and mineral therapy could offer clinical, quality of life, and economic benefits for patients with a previous myocardial infraction. A 50% reduction of urinary Pb and improvement of systolic blood pressure was observed in 33 cardiovascular patients following 20 iv administrations. In another study involving 15 patients of different categories, EDTA also has been shown to be an effective and nontoxic chelator for the removal of xenobiotic metals such as Pb, Cd, Ni and Al. Administration of iv EDTA on weekly basis appears to be a sufficient and nontoxic protocol for treating patients with suspected overload and toxicity of xenobiotic metals especially Pb and Cd. The causative effect of xenobiotic metals in cancer, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, renal and other diseases needs further investigation. Similarly, the use of EDTA chelation therapy in other conditions, which are not related to xenobiotic metal toxicity needs further investigation and confirmation of therapeutic use from controlled randomized clinical trials. Metal balance and drug interaction studies are required to clarify the risk/benefit assessment for the long term use of EDTA in patients with excess xenobiotic metal toxicity and in other conditions.


As interesting as it sounds, I wasn't able to locate much in the way of an in vivo toxicity study for M30. M30 is cited as being non-toxic in this study using cells in a test tube (full-text here). I think based on the following abstract, however, I wouldn't want to try just any iron chelator myself in the absence of a strong in vivo track record:

Synthetic and natural products as iron chelators

An evaluation of existing and proposed Fe chelators, both synthetic and natural products, for the treatment of Fe-overload disease must address a number of issues. There are fundamental parameters that determine the efficacy of a drug: absorption, distribution, metabolism, clearance and toxicity. However, the administration of chelator for Fe overload aims to generate Fe complexes in vivo that are able to be excreted. Hence, the chemical and pharmacological properties of the complexes formed are equally important as the chelators themselves. The redox properties of the Fe complexes formed is particularly relevant to their toxicity. If both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states of the complexes are biologically accessible, then there is potential for the auto-catalytic production of deleterious free radicals, by Fenton-type chemistry. In addition, since the burden of Fe overload disease falls predominantly on some of the poorest economies, the cost of a drug must be considered, as well as the mode of delivery. There are also possible issues with the use of naturally occurring ligands, which may form Fe complexes capable of being utilised by opportunistic bacteria. This review will concentrate on recent developments in our chemical understanding of existing chelators approved or proposed for use and will also consider some of the candidates from natural sources that have been recently proposed.


Unfortunately, I couldn't come up with free full-text on that one. Sounds like it might provide a very useful summary.

Howard





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: chelation, cancer, age

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